GLM Story - By My Overseer

Uncertain's picture

Your First Name: Max
Your Oasis Name: Uncertain
Your Age: 15
City/ Country: Auckland, New Zealand
Your Gender: Male
Bio Paragraph: N/A

Preword: Again, this is one of my previous works~ Back then I considered it finished but I still believe it can be fixed. I need help on making it more 'realistic', and perhaps alter the ending that drags on a bit. It also helps if it doesn't read so much like a monologue (or maybe we can expand on the monologue style). I dno, neways I'll just post it up to see what the editors have to say. I might post a few more past writings tomorrow, just to get them revised but not to say they are all up to standard or that I will submit them. Then I might write some new ones too, but my mind have been really drained up lately... no inspiration... and always gets stuck and the story flows wierd. Blah. Okay so here it is.

By My Overseer

Dear God,

I don’t understand? From the day we were born, our parents chose our names and dreamt the way we would turn out. When we were young we were naïve and lived for the things teachers said were right. When we grew to middle school our friends influence the things we do. Then when we were about to finish school and aspire a certain life, our parents dictated the life we ought to have. I’ve always wanted the same things as them, a loving family, career and hope, but it’s ironic how they would destroy these qualities of their own to achieve them for me through an unrealistic fantasy. When is the time I choose to live my own life?

Amen.

All those times I appear to be confident, aim to excel academically, strive for the best in sports and try a bit too hard in cultural activities have been undermined. Beyond this goal for perfection shadowed an incentive that will be perceived as an immense imperfection, something that scarred me deep and held me hostage upon my realization, yet never did I alarm for help but instead traded my sanity for the submission to my own destruction.

So when my parents found out during high school, they were as horrified as I was when I did so myself at 13. I imagined them going through the same denial, same anguish, same disappointment, and same loss of self which drowns you in regret and guilt. I hoped that they would become reasonably content with it just like I eventually did, even though it still clashes with my faith to this day. They blamed themselves, always did, but I didn’t blame them. I still want them to be happy.

“Son, I want you to be happy,” dad’s voice firmly stated, “Mom and I have been discussing this and we want you to apply for a fundamentalist Christian program for gays.”

My father, being the head of a conservative Christian family, his words were off course final. What he would call discussions with me were only one-way showers of spit on my face. And once you take upon the route of his one-way decision, there is no turning back.

So I must be a big screw up to them because they say there must be something psychologically wrong with me. They tell me I’m not in the path God intended me to be in. Back then I wanted to be perfect, not only in my mind but also in everybody else’s, even God’s. Even though I’ve been housing all this doubt towards a possible change, if I could change my homosexuality through the power of my Lord Jesus Christ, then that would prove my faith to him, and my effort to strive for perfection will eventually be rewarded.

My heart weighed heavily as I applied for this Christian Camp, but I expected tolerant support from all those ‘guiding’ and alike me. But it was nothing along those lines, nothing unlike concentration camps for rejected minorities which they feed you their ethics and force you to follow their lifestyle. We brushed our teeth, used deodorant, ate the same food, studied, prayed, and slept by the clock almost to the minute. We were diagnosed as a disease with a disturbing lifestyle, and expected to cure us by making us comply with a ‘standard’ schedule – but ultimately making our lives theirs.

Media were the root of our sins so we were cut off communication from the outside world; we were tamed cage-animals, or brainwashed prisoners of liberty who have sold their happiness for silent, conforming, obedience. I saw depression sweeping across us like a plague, whilst seeing those in denial who claimed to be cured only clinging to an idealistic wishful hoping. When this Christian camp tried to cure something that isn’t a disease, they gave us one.

I’m not going to make this my life, because there is more to me than just this. When my half year torture was about to end I was debriefed by a minister about my progress. I began lying about how I have changed and how God have saved me to heterosexuality just so my parents will let me out of this hell hole. His pen swiftly moved across the page like it has a life of its own, ridiculing my soulless lies with every stain of ink. He began flowing one question after another until he paused as he reached his last.

“This is the final question; will homosexuality still run your life?” The minister interrogated as his thinning eyebrow lifted. He glanced and scribbled his pen at the side of his page.

We exchanged looks for a second, and then I felt the burden on my lips dissolve like tendrils of smoke fading in thin air. Slowly, I began to uncover this mask I’ve been wearing.

“Homosexuality will never dictate or run my life, not like the way that you have imposed your beliefs on us like homosexuality were the only quality we have. You have stripped us away of our individuality and humanity.” I saw the minister exchanging his pen for another one but I kept on driving out the truth within me. “Everyone who knows me, and really loves me will know that homosexuality is my fate and will forever stay part of me, but it’s not who or what I am. It hadn’t run my life, and it won’t start now.”

The minister stopped and presented me an extended sigh that rested gravely in the atmosphere. He began in a consolidating tone as he advised, “I would rather you commit suicide than have you leave us wanting to return to the gay lifestyle. In a physical death you could still have a spiritual resurrection; whereas, returning to homosexuality you are yielding yourself to a spiritual death from which there is no recovery.”[1] But it was no advice, it was his curse.

I treaded every step of mine heavily on the exiting steps in front of the this hell’s gate, each one representing a different kind of a sorrow and disappointment for those poor hopeless people still inside, my family and even the man up there, God. Another step is for how these fundamentalist Christian Camps are misrepresented as a perfect, caring substitute for family as their true families discard them into a covered up imperfection. And the last one is for me, about how I have misrepresented myself too, striving for an image of perfection to compensate for a hole that isn’t there. But walking out of there is my redemption.

Dear Heavenly Father

You have taught me many things when I thought I was distancing away from you. The new irony I have discovered while I was in the Christian camp is that they tried to oppose what I am by using your voice. Yet when that made me hopeless, you were my only support to stay faithful to who I am when I lay deserted in despair. When they preached love it was intolerance, fanaticism for their one set of morality but you have ultimately opened me up to many more. In the end I didn’t need to prove anything to myself; I don’t have anything to doubt about myself. When everyone wants me to obey to their principles, I am every bit deserving to shine above the rest. I’m still not perfect, just like everybody else. However, today I’m living for myself and not anyone else. After 15 years, I choose freedom.

Amen.

whateversexual_llama's picture

*silence* Wow... that was

*silence* Wow... that was intense. I love the way you told off the minister at the end. There is some difficulty with flow, as you said, but that can be fixed pretty easily. It's mostly within sentances where my brain got tripped up over extra words.

Other than that, I don't see any real problems. You might describe some of the people at the camp, the ministers, the other youth; also you could go into greater detail about that conversation with the minister. Put in some dialogue. Make us squirm.

Anyway, this was great. Keep up the great work; you've got a winner here, content-wise.

Whatever I did, I didn't do it.

Uncertain's picture

Thanks. Well do you think

Thanks. Well do you think the way he told off the minister is a bit unrealistic though... I suppose he was angry but he still seemed calm and engaged in critical, logical thinking. If it does I guess it screws up the credibility of the story.

the mouse that roared's picture

Hey

I like this story a lot. It brings up a good topic and having it bookended by prayer is a cool idea. The plotline is good and you bring up a lot of the issues around going to an ex-gay camp.

I agree with you that it could sound more realistic. Right now, it sounds almost like an essay against concentration camps rather than a story. It leaves us at a comfortable distance from the pain. Don't do that to us. Make us feel what the character is going through.

There is a pretty good fix to this one, though: get yourself out of narrative and more into scenes. What's the first day like? How did you react to what they said? Any huge, horrible scenes? In order to get a more realistic feel of emotions, you can add details of the scene around you and beats like "he looked at the floor" or "I sighed and pulled out my rosary beads for the 502nd time." If you can zoom us into some scenes, this work will become ten times more powerful.

No one has a right to sit down and feel hopeless; there is too much work to do.--Dorothy Day

ForeverEndedToday's picture

You are an amazing author.

You are an amazing author. This is just like wow its amazing. I mean this is wow. I'm going to agree with whateversexual and say to add some quotes from the minister or other ignorant asses in the camp.
99 dreams I have had
In every one a red balloon

patnelsonchilds's picture

Yes, it needs some work

Yes, it needs some work along the lines that the editors have suggested, but I think this is an important theme to be covered in the book, and you've made an excellent start. Don't be afraid to make it longer. It seems that the biggest problem young writers have is that they make their stories too brief and sketchy. I think that's because we all tend to start out writing poetry. In poetry, a lot of allegory and vague suggestion is often a good thing. In prose, it isn't. Prose is more like painting a landscape. You can't just allude to things, you have to paint them in, and the more you want the reader to focus on something, the more you have to emphasize it. In the end, it is the richness of the world you paint that will determine whether the reader winds up just standing outside looking in on your story or getting totally sucked into the middle of it. This is what marks the difference between works that you put down and promptly forget and those that stay with you forever.

- Pat Nelson Childs
"bringing strong gay
characters to Sci-Fi & Fantasy"
http://www.patnelsonchilds.com
http://www.amazon.com/shops/patnelsonchilds

dykehalo's picture

emotional

WOW!!!!!!!!!! I really like that it got me a little emotional only out of one eye though. I think if you make us fell more connected as people have mentioned above i could get emotional out of both eyes.
~~~NO DAY BUT TODAY~~~