Alan Cumming: Interview

Is that so it doesn't go off the rails at some point? You want to make sure your vision is represented?

That's more if I was going to direct it. Sometimes with producing things, it's just that I feel it's sinful that this film is not being made or this thing is not being made, or else it's a thing that I'm really interested in and I want to help out, or it's something I really want to be in so I want to be sure it gets made because I really want to play it.

So, it's all about skipping the audition process...

Sort of, yeah. With "Suffering Man's Charity," for example, that was a thing where I knew if I didn't make it, nobody would make it, because it's so fucked up and I really loved how fucked up it was and I wanted to try and get it made. And once it was going to happen, I wanted to make sure I had the control to keep it the way I felt it was intended and the way it needs to be, which is ... There's lots of sort-of pointy, jagged edges to it and it goes in all these weird ways and weird areas, which is kind of difficult for an audience because it's not what you're used to. But that's on purpose. I wanted to make sure it still had that oddness.

Do you expect it to get a platform release at some point?

It's not confirmed yet, but there's a couple people who are interested, so it looks more than likely that it will have a release. It's just choosing the right one and hopefully they get it right.

And this is an original work?

I didn't write it. I just directed it. This guy Tom Gallagher wrote it. We worked on it together for a while once I was on board, but it's very much his fucked-up mind that's released it. So I'm not guilty.

What's the basic premise?

It's a tale of obsession. It's about a man who's a frustrated music teacher who takes a younger man into his home, and he's obviously a bit nuts at the start. He takes a younger man into his home that says he's a novelist, and it's about just how, you know, the older guy (me) thinks he's being taken advantage of and there's this huge fight, and the movie just goes into the stratosphere of weirdness with crazy people appearing. It shifts genres. Structurally, it's very unusual. It has a central character who's very unsympathetic, bitter, nasty gay man. So, it presses lots of buttons that we're not used to being pressed. It's very provocative and asks you to laugh at things that you're normally told not to laugh at, like people getting hit by trucks and people dying and people getting tortured. It's whacked out. It's twisted.

And tonight, will you be watching it with the audience?

I like watching it. The last festival I was at, I didn't watch it, but I think I might watch it tonight. I just love hearing people's reactions, because it's actually a good film to see with a lot of people. It's so about shouting things out.

Tonight will be good then. A sold out crowd here can be pretty vocal.

Yeah, it's got that thing of ... it's a great one to get a drink and just go in and yell "No!" and "Oh no, he didn't!" Lots of laughter. And lots of just, "Ugh... horrible!" It's a bumpy ride and hopefully a vocal ride for the audience.

Comments

Orah's picture

Thank you for doing this

Thank you for doing this interview, I love Alan Cumming! What a great role model.

now what's picture

Alan Cumming is definitely a

Alan Cumming is definitely a good role model.
And he's so cute too!