I dropped...

msquared's picture

...AP Biology. And it was the best decision of my life. =] Some things just aren't worth it, you know? I'd rather be happy and somewhat slacking than miserable and "ahead of the game"--whatever that means.

I think I'm going to go back to focusing on English and its subsidiaries, reading and writing. That shit I actually ENJOY. =]=]=]=]=]

Comments

5thstory's picture

Bravo. You've just saved

Bravo. You've just saved yourself months of suffering (and you wouldn't be ahead of the game, since that stupid class only serves one purpose: ruin averages). I swear, that class makes everyone's GPAs suffer.
Now, the AP writing classes are a lot of fun. Enjoy :)

" . . . The sun does not shine upon this fair earth to meet frowning eyes, depend upon it." Charles Dickens

Azul's picture

Really? I feel that science

Really? I feel that science itself is one of the most valuable things (It's used to make bridges, antibiotics, rockets, ect). After the basic skill of language and the ability to record things via writing, English serves no purpose except as an aesthetic.

I could just be biased because I'm best at science, especially biology.

msquared's picture

Oh yeah, I absolutely adore

Oh yeah, I absolutely adore the concept of science. Ever read The Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan? Absolutely necessary book for everyone to read. But getting back to the subject, I like science, but I don't love it. Not like English. You could argue that English beyond the basics isn't as important as science, and maybe it's not, but that doesn't mean it's not important at all. Humans are more than machines--we need to feel emotionally and spiritually fulfilled, and artsy stuff like novels and movies are a pretty good device to inspire people and make them happy.

"But don't be afraid to be a fool. Remember, you cannot be both young and wise. Young people who pretend to be wise to the ways of the world are mostly just cynics. Cynicism masquerades as wisdom, but it is the farthest thing from it."
-Stephen Colbert

Azul's picture

It is true that the creative

It is true that the creative mind is necessary for existence in the terms of complex life, but life, even humans, can exist without the creative mind. A scientific mind, that creates vaccines, antibiotics, pharmaceuticals- you name it - helps to continues our existence.

msquared's picture

Aw, that's such a bleak

Aw, that's such a bleak outlook on life. =/ As Abraham Lincoln said, "It's not so much the years in your life that matter, but the life in your years." I think I'd rather live 20 amazing years than 120 miserable ones. Life just isn't worth living if you don't have things like creativity or humor to brighten it up. Cheer up, Mister Azul! There's a fine line between practicality and pessimism.

"But don't be afraid to be a fool. Remember, you cannot be both young and wise. Young people who pretend to be wise to the ways of the world are mostly just cynics. Cynicism masquerades as wisdom, but it is the farthest thing from it."
-Stephen Colbert

Azul's picture

The very existence of

The very existence of humanity, or life in general rather, is to live, reproduce and then die. It's the very nature of our existence, of life. We're simply tools to carry on and to refine our genetic code. That would explain why sex feels good.

Why do we feel so against killing our kin, our species? Where did this value and moral come from? Could it be less anthropological, but instead more rudimentary, more elementary? Could the existence of morals of these said morals be ingrained in our genetic code?

Why does every human feel that they must live on; that they can't die. This would explain the creation of religion. We created heaven and hell to make us believe that there is life after death, that we in fact will carry on the human genetic code for forever.

There's one simple elementary truth to humanity: we want to live. This need, this yearning causes us to have morals and ethics, to have feelings and to believe. We as humans, understood this elementary truth; not necessarily consciously, but we understood it none the less. We became afraid of our realization that we're not important, that we're just tools to evolve, develop and to continue on genetic code. As a result of this fear, we developed aesthetical values, religion and traditions to cover this up; to give us hope.

Doesn't that just depress you? Time for aesthetics =]

Lol-taire's picture

Perhaps it's trite, or at

Perhaps it's trite, or at very least poncey, but biology and English are two sides of the coin to me: one lets us understand ourselves, the other lets us make ourselves understood.

5thstory's picture

There's a huge difference

There's a huge difference between an AP Bio class, and someone who has takes four years -minimum- of science classes to be able to discover/invent anything.
I do think that sciences are the basis of human life, and, why, we wouldn't have half of what we have today if we didn't have scientists. Nevertheless AP Bio is not a good experience at all -even if you get important knowledge from it.

I feel, though, that languages are just as important as sciences. You can't have any of them without the other. Of course, for most people it is more than enough to be able to write and speak decently in one language, but that view, I think, is too utilitarian. The rather rare ability to master a language serves one main purpose: beauty. In the past century beauty was put behind utility, utilitarianism, convenience and discrimination. E. M. Forster's novels and, specially, his essay entitles 'What I Believe', may shed some light on that.

Not everything that serves a purpose is, necessarily, beautiful (in the metaphysical and not physical meaning of the word). Back to my point, anyway: being able to master a language, and be able to write a beautiful novel both in structure and content, I feel, is just as important a bringing a new vaccine into the world. If it wasn't, art would be but a shenanigan, the same as music.

" . . . The sun does not shine upon this fair earth to meet frowning eyes, depend upon it." Charles Dickens

Azul's picture

Sciences aren't difficult

Sciences aren't difficult for me. They never have been. The equivalent course for AP Biology at my school (my school doesn't offer AP sciences), Advanced Biology, was one of the easiest courses in my life. Sure dsRNA, the P-53 gene, usable code in non-functioning DNA and cellular messenger pathways for mitosis were harder concepts to comprehend, but it wasn't that hard.

Anyway - I hardly think that the importance of a novel can be placed higher than a vaccine. Would you like to be alive without a pretty book, or would you like to be dead without a pretty book?