*Title Omitted* (Writing)

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will's picture

WOW

What a writing! it's so good that makes me feel inferior for not getting it >< with lots of big words, i can scarcely grasp the essence of this writing. (no offence) and why is the title named Placebo for a Pessimist?

Uncertain's picture

Hey Will!

Thank you, I love feedback! Haha, I thought this thread would just die and wither away...

Anyways, it's supposed to have the effect of making the reader feel inferior (or patronised) due to its condescending tone. However, it's the tone of the narrator being condescending for intended effect, and not really me being patronising - or at least I'm using the medium of a narrator to achieve the purpose through the intended effect. I hope that makes sense. I just have to emphasise the point that narrator and author are two linked but separate things.

There's a lot I'm trying to convey through this piece of writing. I know it's cryptic and has lots of 'long words', but it's hardly just random words strung together to sound smart (which I'm suspecting people are assuming). That's why there's the 'lotto' paragraph. The passage is meant to be very subtle and confrontational. Almost every word and technique there is selected and crafted with a purpose, and not by mere chance.

Besides that, there's a lot that could also be pulled apart. But to generalise - it's meant to be the stream of consciousness of a pessimist or outcast. That's why the ideas are kind of fragmented. He's discontent with overly optimistic people, or a society that artificially encourages happiness by encouraging certain socially acceptable behaviours, while neglecting those who are not socially acceptable.

To answer your question, 'Placebo for a Pessimist' is actually a metaphor. The placebo is a social construct that society is 'fed' and believes it works (like a placebo), but you have to actually believe it works. A pessimist in this case is a representation of those people who are able to see behind the 'placebo' and knows the flaws of these social constructs (I'm generalising a lot here to save time). Placebo is also a reference to medicine, therefore there's the recurring motif of cancer and death and the comparison between 'cancer' and 'optimists'.

Thanks for the comment again by the way, glad you appreciated it. =)