ACLU Complaint Takes On “Decoy” Prom For Mississippi Lesbian Student

jeff's picture

New Information Revealed In Constance McMillen Case

ABERDEEN, MS – The American Civil Liberties Union filed legal papers today in federal court on behalf of lesbian high school student Constance McMillen regarding a cruel plan to put on a “decoy” prom for her while the rest of her classmates were at a private prom 30 miles away. The amended complaint alleges that the district’s violation of the free speech rights of McMillen, an 18-year-old high school senior who sued her school for canceling the prom rather than let her attend with her girlfriend, have repeatedly caused McMillen to be humiliated and harassed.

“I really hoped that prom night would make all that I’ve been through worth it, then April 2 came and those hopes went out the window,” said McMillen. “All I ever wanted was to go to my school prom with my classmates and my date, like anyone else, and instead I was the target of a mean, nasty joke.”

On March 23, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi issued a preliminary ruling in McMillen’s case that school officials violated McMillen’s First Amendment rights when it canceled the high school prom rather than let McMillen attend with her girlfriend and wear a tuxedo. The court stopped short of ordering Itawamba Agricultural High School (IAHS) to put the school prom back on the calendar relying on assurances that an alternative “private” prom being planned by parents would be open to all students, including McMillen.

However, according to legal papers, at a meeting with school officials, parents then decided to cancel that private prom without notifying McMillen because they did not want to allow McMillen to attend, instead organizing a “decoy” prom for McMillen and her date and still another prom for the rest of the class. McMillen and her date then attended the event the school had told her was “the prom for juniors and seniors” on April 2, where they found only seven other students attending. Principal Trae Wiygul and several school staff members were supervising that event while most of McMillen’s classmates were at the other prom in Evergreen, Mississippi.

“Constance is a very brave young woman, and she has suffered tremendously because of the animosity and hate she’s felt coming from her classmates and her community which the school’s actions have encouraged,” said Kristy Bennett, Legal Director of the ACLU of Mississippi. “Even after a federal court found that the school violated her constitutional rights, an 18-year-old girl has been made the scapegoat and an outsider in the town where she’s lived all her life. For the school to subject Constance to this type of hostility is simply inexcusable.”

Today’s amended complaint contains new details about events that have taken place since the ACLU first filed McMillen’s case on March 11, including about the way her classmates have treated her. Most of McMillen’s classmates no longer speak to her, and some have posted Facebook messages saying they wish she were dead and sent her such text messages as, “I don’t know why you come to this school because no one likes your gay ass anyways.” In response to the court’s March 23 order, the complaint also adds a request for compensatory damages for an amount to be determined later at trial.

“After the court ruled that IAHS acted illegally when it canceled the prom, we hoped that Constance would be able to attend the private prom without further incident,” said Christine P. Sun, Senior Counsel with the ACLU national LGBT Project, who represents McMillen along with the ACLU of Mississippi. “But instead there was a malicious plan to further ostracize and humiliate her. It is hard to conceive of adults behaving in such a cruel way.”

McMillen is represented by Bennett and Sun, as well as by Norman C. Simon, Joshua Glick, and Jason Moff of Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP, and Alysson Mills of New Orleans.

The case name is Constance McMillen v. Itawamba County School District, et al. Additional information is available at www.aclu.org/lgbt-rights/fulton-ms-prom-discrimination. There is also a Facebook group for people who want to support McMillen, “Let Constance Bring Her Girlfriend to the Prom,” at www.facebook.com/pages/Let-Constance-Take-Her-Girlfriend-to-Prom/3576867....

jeff's picture

Hmm...

I like the ACLU, but I don't think this one has any legs. They didn't move the prom, as all the school officials and such were at the one Constance attended, so she went to prom. The rest of her class skipped prom.

Humiliated and harassed for filing the lawsuit? Awful, but probably not illegal.

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"Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are." - Kurt Cobain

oldfoxbob's picture

maybe not

However seeing as how the school officials were at the one prom and no students were other than 7 special ed kids, it is a given that they knew of the other prom also. Hence were at fault and liable for any action against the girl in the first place. Since other students knew of the plans for a second prom and its location Teachers and students knew of its location and failing to inform McMillen of that fact makes them liable. This has been upheld in courts all over the US for similar type events. Such as dances, dinners, civil right violations etc.
Genius is not a sign of intelligence, but rather

that of common sense. Humor is the best pain pill.

jeff's picture

Hmm...

I don't see how you can connect the school administration as knowing, though, since they were at what was supposed to be the school's prom, which few students attended. Clearly, the students knew, but they used their own money to rent a different place and have a private party there. Not sure how that shows teachers or anyone in the administration knew. Even the students, possibly prepped, seem to be clear that they skipped their prom, and went to a private party instead. Prom wasn't moved. It wasn't attended.

Once you establish a link to the administration knowing, then sure...

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"Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are." - Kurt Cobain