Alan Cumming

Alan Cumming: Interview

By Jeff Walsh

Alan Cumming does it all well: actor, screenwriter, director, novelist, singer... hell, he even has his own fragrance. I got the chance to sit down with Cumming (that's my hand on his shoulder) when he was in town for the showing of Suffering Man's Charity at the San Francisco gay film festival back in June.

As these things often work, the interview is done in the afternoon on the day the movie is screening, so you basically interview him about a movie you haven't seen, and then once you see it, he's out of town. I was holding the interview to time it with the long-passed DVD release of "Rick & Steve: The Happiest Gay Couple In All The World," which never seems to show up in my mailbox. So, I figure, we'll just run the interview on Thanksgiving, since Alan is someone for whom the community is thankful.

In Rick & Steve, Cumming plays the elderly, HIV-positive Chuck, who adds a lot of un-PC color to the amazingly funny proceedings. Back when I reviewed that, a few of you did the math regarding his four-year relationship with his 19-year-old boyfriend, and were rightfully appalled. Hopefully LOGO goes for another season of Rick & Steve, which is just amazing work from queer cinema wunderkind Q. Allan Brocka.

Of course, like a true theater queen, I start the interview with the Cumming that I know best, the one who injected an amazing amount of fresh energy into Cabaret for its restaging on Broadway a decade ago. His Tony-winning role as the emcee ratcheted up the role's sex appeal and the good news (possibly an Oasis exclusive?) ... he might be hitting the boards again for the show's anniversary:

Suffering Man's Charity: Movie Review

By Jeff Walsh

In "Suffering Man's Charity," Alan Cumming delivers a tour-de-force as both actor and director in this dark comic romp.

Cumming plays John Vandermark, a music teacher who dreams of writing an opera, although his greatest talent seems to be in supporting artistic younger men. His latest conquest/charity case is Sebastian St. Germain (played by David Boreanaz), whose novel seems as non-existent as his celibacy, although the latter is only reserved for his host.

When Vandermark discovers that Germain is sleeping around with women around town, they have a very spirited knock-down-drag-out bitchfest about it, to put it lightly.

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