Jim Fall

Jim Fall Interview

By Jeff Walsh

When I decided to relaunch Oasis as a magazine again, one of the things I did was to look back and review the list of people we had featured in the past. Just doing that became a sort of fun exercise in seeing what some of those same people were up to these days.

When I saw the interview with Jim Fall, director of Trick (one of my favorite gay movies of all time), I quickly jumped over to IMDB to see what he's been doing lately. I knew about the Lizzie McGuire Movie, but above that was an entry called "Wedding Wars." A bit of poking around, and it seemed that his newest movie was happening just in time for our relaunch. Wedding Wars (see my review) features John Stamos as a wedding planner who causes a national movement of gay people refusing to go to work, when confronted with the injustice surrounding gay marriage. But instead of a hectoring, political treatise that would preach to the converted, fail to sway the undecided, and not interest the red states, Fall humanizes the issue with a fun, genuine story that humanizes both sides of the issue. The movie plays for laughs and emotional resonance, while advancing the gay marriage debate in a positive way.

'Wedding Wars' Review

By Jeff Walsh

"Wedding Wars" (airing Monday, December 11, 9 p.m. ET/PT, on A&E) is the story of two brothers. Shel is a gay party planner hired to plan his brother Ben's wedding. Ben is marrying the daughter of the Governor of Maine. It's an election year, and the governor ends up going on the record that he opposed gay marriage, which offends Shel. Shel goes on strike and causes a nationwide movement of gays who refuse to go to work.

OK, I'll go on the record right up front that it isn't the most realistic movie, if you're looking for politics. But, that said, if someone like me, living in the Castro in San Francisco, watched this and thought it really hit the mark... then people that really need to see it would hate it completely.

Anatomy of a One Night Stand: Jim Fall Interview

First-time Director Jim Fall brings gay romance to the screen with "Trick"

By Jeff Walsh

The best movie I saw this summer was "Trick," a story about a nervous composer whose one-night stand with a go-go boy is never consummated. In what could have been very cliché and poorly executed, Trick rises above the fold due to its amazing performances and direction by first-time movie director Jim Fall.

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