Music

Jeff Manabat of the Kinsey Sicks Interview

By Jeff Walsh

The Kinsey Sicks have been part of my life in San Francisco for as long as I can remember. But, these days, this dragapella beauty shop quartet is spreading its music and message (and STDs, in the case of Rachel) throughout North America as a constantly touring group. The group was first profiled in Oasis back in November of 1999, and have never stopped coming up with hilarious shows, outlandish improv, and "Oh no, they didn't!" moments.

2007 will see the DVD release of their first-ever concert film "I Wanna Be A Republican" (currently playing festivals and seeking a distributor) as well as an episodic reality show, "Almost Infamous," documenting their journey to debuting a show in Las Vegas. The group consists of four members: Ben Schatz as the slutty Rachel, Irwin Keller as the lesbolicious neatfreak Winnie, Chris Dilley as the vapid vampy Trampolina, and Jeff Manabat as the glamorous (and easy) Trixie.

The Happiest Place on Earth

Techno-duo Matmos (Martin Schmidt and Drew Daniel) talk about their music, touring with Bjork, and sleeping under a piano

By Japiya Burns

Coming across a Georgia O’Keeffe painting recently, from “The Poetry of Things,” I am strangely reminded of Matmos’ music. The painting is of a stark green apple sitting plainly on a circular black plate, set against a white background. The black plate is so fluid, an oval of reflected light against its bottom lip, that it carries the qualities of not only the juicy apple, but of human lips, of something sensuous and bigger than itself. In this way Matmos sample the sounds of everyday objects, the human body even, and find beauty and music in them.

Sacha Sacket finds his artistic voice on Alabaster Flesh

Interview by Greling Jackson

When it came to meeting him for the first time, I felt a sense of welcoming like never before. Sacha had an aura that seemed to possess every soul in the room. Never had I met a person who was so talented and bore such a sincere passion for his art. As I gazed into his eyes, I knew that interviewing him would prove to be a pleasurable experience. I had met one the few people in this world that could befriend anyone and bring out the positive light in any situation.

Rufus Wainwright strikes impressive Poses with new album

By Jeff Walsh

Rufus Wainwright walks into the Great American Music Hall in San Francisco the afternoon before his sold out show. He finishes up a cell phone call, sizes up the room, and immediately approaches me. “I don’t know you, so you must be here to interview me,” he says, and we immediately go find a place downstairs as his crew continues tuning his piano and setting up the stage.

Jade Esteban Estrada, Latin pop's openly gay "Angel"

By Jeff Walsh

I'll admit right up front that I have totally become a total Latin pop queen. On my Rio MP3 Player that I take to the gym, there is always a Latin mix to keep me pushing through my cardio workouts. Ricky Martin, Jennifer Lopez, Marc Anthony, Chayanne, and Shakira keep my feet moving and spirits high. My workout is always more intense with Latin beats propelling it.

A Reading From The Gospel, According To Shawn Thomas

By Troy N. Diggs

Many people wouldn’t think the words “gay gospel singer from Alabama” make any sense put together, let alone to describe someone. However, musician Shawn Thomas is, yes, gay… and a singer… originally from Texas, now in Alabama… who (among other things) sings religious music.

Mike James – Doing Things His Way

By Troy N. Diggs
Oasis Staff Writer

Out blues/funk/alternative artist Mike James may not have the star power of, say, the Backstreet Boys, N*Sync, or Britney Spears… but unlike many of the commercially made pop artists flooding the airwaves today, James' music comes from the soul.

"I’m hoping that people can appreciate a youngster that actually has some substance, as opposed to a youngster who’s just a hooker," he jokes. "There’s a lot of stuff out there that’s just there to sell records to 11-year old girls." James' background is, ironically enough, based in what he describes as the "Manhattan modeling scene"; the well-groomed, pre-fab, ready-made pop icons. "They wanted really different things for me. They wanted for me to be very rustic and outdoorsy, and very boy next door… and that’s not me. I’m just going to do my thing, and I don’t want to do pop commercials or go on TV pushing Jell-O. I went home, gained a lot of weight, took some time for myself, and started writing music, and playing out of coffeeshops and colleges. I was doing a whole different thing."

Gay youth concept album comes from a forbidden planet

By Jeff Walsh

Songs about gay youth are nothing new. Many bands have analyzed the confusions, joys and sorrows of growing up gay. "Deep Water" by Pansy Division has always been a personal favorite of mine in this sub-genre.

But with its new album Queen City, Invaders From Another Planet have taken this category to a whole new level by releasing an entire concept album about gay youth.

Garrin Benfield's debut album, "a dream" worth remembering

By Jeff Walsh

On a random night out in San Francisco a few months back, the bill featured an unannounced addition. Garrin Benfield, a cute, waifish guitar player, took to the stage to play some of his original folk-tinged music. Benfield's music immediately resonated with me and I was glad to be able to buy one of the ten demo CDs he had brought with him that night.

Blue Period set to deliver product this month

By Jeff Walsh

Blue Period is about to launch onto the music scene this month with their first al-bum, Product. The San Francisco band describes its sound as glittery hard rock meets dark arty pop.

The band is fronted by Adrian Roberts, a 29-year-old self-described omnisexual gender-morphed tranny freak. Swirly Rat Jr., the 35-year-old bass player for the band is also queer. The rest of the band consist of Matt Chaikin, 35, on drums; PF, 29, electronics; and Christopher Hogan, 26, guitar.

Will Pansy Division become the Fag Fab Four?

By Jeff Walsh, Oasis Editor

Pansy Division knows what people say about them: They're a gimmick band, a bit too penis-centric and not to be taken seriously. And there are enough songs which support that theory, quite honestly. But as bassist Chris Freeman pointed out in a recent interview with Oasis, they might be seen as a gimmick band, but they're about to release their fifth album and making a living. The new album, "More Lovin' From Our Oven" on Lookout Records, is a compilation of their latest EPs.

Life beyond faith: Roddy Bottum's new 'teen' angst

By Jeff Walsh

As the keyboardist for Faith No More, Roddy Bottum bent the stereotypical image of the "gay piano player." His melodic piano capped the band's monster hit "Epic," which until his piano solo is a rollicking metal-rap song. Bottum plays the melody at the part near the video's end where a fish is flipping around on the dirt.

Openly gay Kitten comes out of his shell for solo album

By Jeff Walsh

With his acoustic album "Motorcycle Childhood," Tyson Meade uses spare arrangement and raw vocals to share details of his life. It's very different from his other role as the openly gay lead singer of the Chainsaw Kittens, where he used to take to the stage in lipstick, tights and mini-skirts.

Pansy Division

By Jeff Walsh

In February, queer punk fans will get another peek into Jon Ginoli's bedroom as Pansy Division releases its third album.

As was the case with their two previous albums, Ginoli is still single, still frustrated with the gay community and still writing great music for everyone else in the same situation.

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